There were several insights about what made millennials tick, so I extrapolated what millennial farmers might want to see happen for them. I also had the privilege of meeting an energetic group of the Alberta Young Farmers’, people who are young, and positive about their future in agriculture. Here are ten things I learned that millennial farmers want...

It’s summer, and you are wondering if this is the last season for you working on the farm because you are tired of chronic fighting.
No matter how hard you have worked at trying to get along and make things work, sometimes the conflict situation cannot be resolved.  You need to move on, realizing that you can only control your own actions. To continue in the muck takes endless energy, and it is draining you.

Balancing work and family on the farm is an on-going process. It involves an intentional holistic approach to the many roles farm families perform managing the overload of busy seasons.
Research by Dr. Nikki Gerrard of Saskatchewan, who spent 12 years looking at resiliency in farm families, found that the keys to bouncing back…balanced living…are communication, connection, and a deep sense of community. My studies at the Hudson Institute framed balance as “hold on, let go, take on, and move on.” ...

Protecting your business protects your livelihood and contracts can help do that.  The following information guide can help make sure your contract is complete and valid.  Remember that contracts set expectations and boundaries for both parties transacting business...

Many next generation farmers that I coach are sick of complaining and want this year to be the year they finally gain some equity.
Farmers love carrots don’t you know? They dangle the proverbial carrot for years in front of the next generation, so to keep the young folks guessing when they will become part-owners, and have their dreams turn into reality...  

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